Corregidor in Snapshots

Spent two days in tiny Corregidor Island to see the derelict artillery guns and old ruins, and glimpse into the past lives of soldiers who served and died on the historic island.

“Corregidor Island, locally called Isla ng Corregidor, is an island located at the entrance of Manila Bay in southwestern part of Luzon Island in the Philippines. Due to this location, Corregidor was fortified with several coastal artillery and ammunition magazines to defend the entrance of Manila Bay and the City of Manila from attacks by enemy warships in the event of war. Located 48 kilometres (30 mi) inland, Manila has been the largest city and the most important seaport in the Philippines for centuries, from the colonial rule of Spain, the United States, and Japan and after the establishment of the Republic of the Philippines in 1946.” – Wikipedia

MMDA’s New Bus Segregation Scheme

Starting this week the Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) implemented a scheme that categorized buses into three classes: A, B, and C. About time too! Traffic has always been a problem in the metro. I’ve always wondered why the MMDA didn’t implement something similar to other countries where buses have designated stops.

I hope both drivers abd commuterd cooperate so that this new strategy will work.

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Manila Bay

It’s ironic that something that is severely in need of environmental protection and rehabilitation could produce one of the world’s best sunset scenes.

Manila Bay serves as the gateway to Manila, even before the arrival of the Spaniards, and remains, to this day as an important source for commerce and industry. However, “rapid urban growth and industrialization are contributing to a decline in water quality and deteriorating marine habitats.” (Wikipedia)

Still, despite its pressing problems, Manila Bay continues to captivate those who have seen her true beauty.

All photos taken on October 31  by Ryan, a friend of mine.

Typhoon Pedring

I’d like to say it’s raining cats and dogs out there but the rain isn’t even that strong. It’s not the true threat. The real threat is the wind. It’s been howling like a deranged wolf since early morning. Advisory fro the Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astrnonomical Services Administration (PAGASA) stated the eye of the storm was 110km East of Baguio City at 9:00AM. There should be another major advisory coming out at 11:00AM, so keep a lookout for it.

Meanwhile, many government and private offices have suspended work Due to the bad weather. Yet there are a number of people here in the office. Guess Pedring couldn’t really keep them from their jobs. As for me, I live neatby and it doesn’t flood in our area so it’s easy for me to go to the office or go home. Guess I was really bored with the power outage. Bummer. I could have just slept it off but I’d rather be productive instead. Haha!

To anyone going to and from work, please be careful. There are numerus trees and electtical posts that have toppled over due to the strong winds. PAGASAexpects the typhoon to be in Baguio this afternoon and out of the country by tomorrow. But know mows, Pedring ight decide to loiter so let’s all hope it decides to leave immediately and with minimal damage (or less than it already has done).

Edit:
The typhoon’s eye is now just 100 km from Baguio City. Pedring is worsening the effects of the Southwest monsoon. Now the rains are starting to pour! Was I right when I said there could be another “Ondoy” thus year? The weather bureau still expects five to six more storms for the rest of the year. And if each storm intensifies the SW monsoon evrytime, then each storm not only brings rain and strong winds, but it brings more rains!

Edit 2:
Just got wind that there is another weather disturbance brewing in the east. If it enters the Philippine area of responsibility, it will be dubbed, “Quiel” and it is expected to make landfall as early as Monday.

Edit 3: Forgot to mention that it’s the first time I’ve actually seen storm surges along Roxas Boulevard. That’s quite scary!

Images courtesy of The Manila Paper.